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I don't feel like it...

I just don't feel like it. I don't want to wake up each day, or keep going. Being awake is exhausting.

In Shane Snow on Storytelling, Snow introduces Relatability, Novelty, Tension, and Fluency as the elements of great stories. They are the elements that keep us wanting to come back again, or stay through to the end.

There is a phenomenon were oxytocin is built in the brain when experiencing great stories together. They found that sitting kids in a room and telling them stories actually produced oxytocin in their brain, and the act of hearing stories together created bonds.

Maybe I'm telling myself the wrong stories, and since I'm doing it alone, they are starving me of the bonds I need.

I need to spend time telling and hearing stories with others... maybe that would help.

Darrell





Focused Character Bio and Rough Outlines...

... are crucial to have before you start, but they're not what you think they are.
Notes from Lisa Cron's Wired for Story: My notes from around page 91
Focused Character Bio's to answer only TWO questions.Having no character bio to start is just as bad as having one that's too detailed or robust. One gives you no thread to weave into the story, no "why" or "what" to hang on to. The other gives you so many details these are still obscured.

Page 91:
That's why, when writing your protagonists' bio, the goal is to pinpoint two things: 1. the event in his past that knocked his worldview out of alignment, triggering the internal issue that keeps him from achieving his goal; 2. and the inception of his desire for the goal itself. So that's an order for

1. One worldview altering event (broken soul, pain point, causing a fear) that keeps him from his inner lifelong goal. This event can happen before the story proper and we may only catch glimpses of i…

Notes from Ted Dekkers talk on storytelling (condensed)

What is story? 

Story is a series of events involving worthy characters who change (are transformed) as a result of those events.Take the reader into a Fictive Bubble, and don’t pop it!Ask ONE question you struggle with… and press your character until he is transformed and finds the answer. You should be transformed through the process too (if not, keep digging).

That path must be clear to you, you are your character's muse or guide. He will hit seven way-points.

Back-story. In the first few pages, introduce your reader to the protagonist and his/her world.Inciting EventThe event that forces the protag into the story, with a clear goal.There may be a clear, specific threat.Series of Challenges and Solutions.Your protag tries a series of solutions and fails. Things seem to go well, and all hope is lost.Something BIG has to happen, or all is lost.Subtle changes. Character is wrestling through, lost in the fog.Dramatic turning point.A major change in your characters perspective.Small ch…

Distortion Critiques Combined

So I put out scene one from Distortion for a writer's critique. Here was the result:

It's amazing how awesome this feedback was. You can live with your stuff long enough that you become blind to it. I have a lot of work to do (first novel) but I've studied the craft long enough to understand everything everyone is saying. Besides all the specific points, the two themes I noticed were a lack of emotional/physical reaction (nothing to keep you in Ash's head) and the Great Sin (show don't tell). I also changed tense and didn't notice (no that was not on purpose). There were many other great points, and I have a lot of work to do. Thanks again to http://www.scribophile.com/ for making a community for writers.

Here I'm putting all five reviews together. Taking the things that I liked from each and putting them together. In a few cases I just made the change because I liked it. Mostly I just pasted notes together. A lot of people picked up on the same points, so it…

Research: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, PTSD, Symptoms and Gun rules

Here is some background information I found on PTSD, it may help me flesh out Ash's character more.

University of Maryland Medical Center has a great article breaking down PTSD and treatment.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that is brought on by memories of an extremely stressful event or series of events that cause intense fear, particularly if feelings of helplessness accompanied the fear.
Symptoms of PTSD usually develop within the first 3 months after the event, but they may not surface until months or even years after the original traumatic event. Symptoms may include:
Intrusive thoughts recalling the traumatic eventNightmaresFlashbacksEfforts to avoid feelings and thoughts that either remind you of the traumatic event or that trigger similar feelingsFeeling detached or unable to connect with loved onesDepression, hopelessnessFeelings of guilt (from the false belief that you were responsible for the traumatic incident)Irritability or angry outburstsHy…

First round of critiques for Distortion Scene 1 "Street Noise"

One of the scariest things for most authors (especially fiction authors) to do is open their work to the blatant critique of others. The author got to know their work so well, they know the backstory (that never made it onto the page), etc.


This very intimacy makes them blind to the things the reader sees immediately.

As Ernest Hemingway famously said, “The first draft of anything is *crap.”
I put out the 1st scene of Distortion, "Street Noise", for a writers critique. It was quite illuminating. I chose not to take it personally but learn from each point. Some things I agreed with, some I didn't. Some were clear craft mistakes while others were stylistic choices I could take or leave.

I have a feeling that my re-write will be so much better due to this experience. I also found a critique buddy (Hey Ashleigh!) who I can work with as I go through re-writes.

Distortion Scene 1 "Street Noise" can be read in its current form (as of today) in the second draft on my It…

Distortion Critique 5

So I put out scene one from Distortion for a writer's critique. Here was the result:

It's amazing how awesome this feedback was. You can live with your stuff long enough that you become blind to it. I have a lot of work to do (first novel) but I've studied the craft long enough to understand everything everyone is saying. Besides all the specific points, the two themes I noticed were a lack of emotional/physical reaction (nothing to keep you in Ash's head) and the Great Sin (show don't tell). I also changed tense and didn't notice (no that was not on purpose). There were many other great points, and I have a lot of work to do. Thanks again to http://www.scribophile.com/ for making a community for writers.



S. M. Savoy Inline CritiqueOut of
Fromthe corner of his eye, through the window of The Grounded Cafe, Ash saw two men dressed in black combat gear duck behind a car.
scrib is doing weird things with your spacing . I'm seeing big gaps between text. Coolness rushe…

Darrell's Reading List


Here are some books I've been reading lately:
  • Hacker: The Outlaw Chronicles (here) by Ted Dekker (Author). The story of a young Hacker girl, who went on a wild adventure into the supernatural realm beyond trying to save her mom, but saved her self too in the process.
  • Saint: A Paradise Novel (here) by Ted Dekker (Author). He's an assassin, or is he? He finds a secret to his past that unlocks supernatural abilities, at a cost.
  • For a full list of all my book suggestions, see my Amazon Store.

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